Posts Tagged ‘Bloomberg Businessweek’

With Nicki Minaj screaming at you like that, how could you stop from picking up a copy of BlackBook?

For that reason, BlackBook gets my vote for best magazine cover of 2011. It invited a staring contest between me and Ms. Minaj, more so than any other magazine cover last year, so that wins it for me.

BlackBook’s cover also made MTV Style’s list of best fashion magazine covers for the year. But at the top of MTV’s list was none other than Beyonce, who graced a cover of Dazed & Confused and who doesn’t lose many contests. In fact, I’ll make a bet now that Beyonce and Jay-Z’s baby graces the cover of some top-selling magazine in 2012.

Vogue, which also won Magazine of the Year from Ad Age, got the thumbs-up mid-year from Newsstand Pros for the magazine’s cover photo of Natalie Portman.

But enough about famous beautiful women. Let’s give the men some love too! OK, says The Mag Guy, who (while not giving Donald Trump any undue positive attention) celebrated the cover line gracing this front page of Bloomberg Businessweek: “Seriously?” Business Insider agreed too, and now I’m adding to the list, putting The Donald on my radar for best of 2011.

Why, exactly? Because while Nicki Minaj’s huge open-mouth display made me look at the cover with intrigue, Donald Trump’s makes me giggle and get heartburn at the same time. And it’s that evocation of emotion that makes a good cover.

Speaking of emotion, where are the big stories of the year? I wanted a good Steve Jobs cover and a good Osama-We-Got-You cover. There were a few. Ad Age celebrates several of those in its roundup. But none of them appealed to me as much as I expected. However, The New Yorker tsunami cover that Ad Age gave #1 props to is poetic, understated and deserving.

And one cover in particular was a great disappointment to me. Lindsay Lohan, whose Playboy show-and-tell spread was so anticipated by millions of disgustingly horny men, appeared on the cover of said issue and didn’t even look recognizable! What a shame. I stared at her face forever trying to figure out if that was even her. I get that it was a Marilyn Monroe throwback, but I guess I just don’t get why they chose to do it that way. Regardless, it’s a 2012 issue, so whether I like it or not is pretty irrelevant to this post — it’s just on my mind!

Hungry for more? Check out Fashionista’s faves and Cover Junkie’s countdown. What are your favorites of 2011?

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Outlook (www.outlookindia.com)

When I went to India a few months ago, I wanted to pick up a magazine I couldn’t read — at all. No English. There were a few to choose from, and the one I ended up with was Outlook.

Obviously, this is not something I can critique on content. And design-wise, it reminds me of the old design of BusinessWeek — the stories are long but broken up with sidebars and charts; the content is serious and newsy; and the photos are mostly stock news photography and headshots. One thing that strikes me as very different from any American news magazine is that it contains what appears to be poetry, spanning four pages, and also what appears to be fiction or humor across several other pages.

Interestingly, American politics takes up some space. One long article includes a photo of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and the back few pages, which appears to be a “year in review” photo essay, include photos of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama during last fall’s visit there, dancing with Indian children and spending time with the Indian people.

What foreign magazines have you seen? Could you make sense of what you were looking at even without knowing the language?

–Tyler W. Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review

Magazine covers are a common topic on The Sidebar Review. Luke Hayman of design firm Pentagram told AdWeek what he thought the best covers of last year were at this link. He chose the following:

I thought the Spin cover (May 2010), pictured, was the most clever of the ones he mentioned. Because, just think about it: You’re standing at the newsstand looking at the cover, knowing that you want to tear it, but you can’t unless you own it! (Surely, torn ones were on each magazine stand that carried it, but where’s the pleasure if you don’t get to do it yourself?)

What are your favorites? Why?

–Tyler W. Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review

Steve Jobs while introducing the iPad in San F...

Image via Wikipedia

I just read a great article called iPadded Profits? that takes to task publishers and consumers alike who don’t know how much they should pay or charge for a digital magazine. He references this post that talks about cost and functionality of digital magazines as common frustrations. One of the commenters pointed out that people either want their digital edition to be cheaper or they want to get some additional functionality or information out of it.

I was floored last night at Barnes & Noble at the cost of printed magazines. Most copies were $4.99 or $5.99. Many copies were $9.99 and $10.99. Huh? I could have bought books for the prices of these magazines (at least on the bargain aisle). I almost bought a copy of Bloomberg Businessweek, but at $4.99, I chose instead to buy a copy on Zinio where I had a $5 credit. It was between Businessweek and Oxford American for me at that price point, and I chose Oxford American because, for the same price, I could have a magazine that’s outdated tomorrow (because Businessweek is a weekly) or one that’s not outdated until nearly Independence Day. So…Oxford American won, hands down. And on Zinio, I got the newer version of Businessweek that hasn’t hit the newsstands yet.

So if prices on the actual newsstand are so high that I’m playing expiry-date games to choose where to spend my money, what does that say for digital magazines? From a consumer perspective, I believe a digital version (that is, a nearly PDF version that does not have added functionality, like most magazines on Zinio and other digital newsstands) should cost slightly less than a printed version. I believe a digital version that has additional functionality as part of an app (like Bloomberg Businessweek’s app) should cost the same as a printed version.

What I hope the publishing world goes to is a model like The Wall Street Journal’s, which is a choice between a print subscription, a digital subscription, and a combination print and digital at a reduced rate.

What’s your thought? Have you read a magazine on an iPadiPhoneAndroidBlackberry, or your laptop/desktop? What was the experience like for you? How much are you willing to pay for a print magazine, and how much do you think you should pay for a digital version of the same?

–Tyler W. Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review

I don’t like to see people get fired. Especially when I feel attached to them. When Michael Bloomberg took over BusinessWeek, I swore it off. I had gotten BusinessWeek free for three years as part of my Executive MBA program. I loved it. I would spend a couple of hours every week reading it, fantasizing about how smart I would be someday and creating a mental image of how refined I already was for reading BusinessWeek in my spare time.

So when multiple employees (many of them editorial) were let go last year, I was unhappy. I had read their stories, looked at their charts, absorbed their sidebars. I felt like this know-it-all millionaire had come into my playground and messed up the sandbox. I just was not going to play anymore.

But time has passed, and this new article has piqued my interest in the magazine once again. Richard Turley, a 30-something from Britain (a little reminiscent of Jonathan Ive, maybe?), pushed for a dramatic redesign and got it. The magazine’s creative director is daring with charts and photo shoots and concepts. I love this quote of his:

“One of the things I wanted to do was to have a magazine which you could graze. The idea that you could have two different kinds of reading experiences. One where you just flick through it. There’s a lot of ways of getting into articles, there’s a lot of things going on the page that hopefully catch your eye. So you can have a rich reading experience without actually reading the magazine. But, if you want to read the magazine, there’s a lot there to read.”

So what changed with the redesign? Everything. The covers are really intriguing — I’ve been watching them the last few months. I’ve just downloaded the new Bloomberg Businessweek iPad app that I plan to spend time with this afternoon, and next time I’m in the bookstore, I’ll pick up a physical copy. Some complaints I’ve read about it say that the magazine traded content for looks, or that the journalism has suffered so that the book will be more beautiful. I hope that’s not the case. Because now, after this year-and-a-half-or-so of being without the magazine, I want to open it again and enjoy it.

Have you seen the new Bloomberg Businessweek? What do you think of it? Click through here to see some of the more interesting pages from the past year.

Tyler Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review

Update 4/25/11: Richard Turley got even more praise today by WWD Media. The entire article is here. This is an excerpt: “Turley, a quick study of the company line, explained how the open seating plan in the Bloomberg offices encourages the magazine’s art directors and editors, who sit amongst each other in the office, to collaborate. ‘Bloomberg is a very ego-flat place to work,’ he said.”