Posts Tagged ‘iPhone’

Steve Jobs while introducing the iPad in San F...

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I just read a great article called iPadded Profits? that takes to task publishers and consumers alike who don’t know how much they should pay or charge for a digital magazine. He references this post that talks about cost and functionality of digital magazines as common frustrations. One of the commenters pointed out that people either want their digital edition to be cheaper or they want to get some additional functionality or information out of it.

I was floored last night at Barnes & Noble at the cost of printed magazines. Most copies were $4.99 or $5.99. Many copies were $9.99 and $10.99. Huh? I could have bought books for the prices of these magazines (at least on the bargain aisle). I almost bought a copy of Bloomberg Businessweek, but at $4.99, I chose instead to buy a copy on Zinio where I had a $5 credit. It was between Businessweek and Oxford American for me at that price point, and I chose Oxford American because, for the same price, I could have a magazine that’s outdated tomorrow (because Businessweek is a weekly) or one that’s not outdated until nearly Independence Day. So…Oxford American won, hands down. And on Zinio, I got the newer version of Businessweek that hasn’t hit the newsstands yet.

So if prices on the actual newsstand are so high that I’m playing expiry-date games to choose where to spend my money, what does that say for digital magazines? From a consumer perspective, I believe a digital version (that is, a nearly PDF version that does not have added functionality, like most magazines on Zinio and other digital newsstands) should cost slightly less than a printed version. I believe a digital version that has additional functionality as part of an app (like Bloomberg Businessweek’s app) should cost the same as a printed version.

What I hope the publishing world goes to is a model like The Wall Street Journal’s, which is a choice between a print subscription, a digital subscription, and a combination print and digital at a reduced rate.

What’s your thought? Have you read a magazine on an iPadiPhoneAndroidBlackberry, or your laptop/desktop? What was the experience like for you? How much are you willing to pay for a print magazine, and how much do you think you should pay for a digital version of the same?

–Tyler W. Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review

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I’ve mentioned before how enamored I am of social media. It’s something I’ve been pushing at work for ages but haven’t had a lot of buy-in. Recently, someone has come in who is as excited about it as I am, and she let me go to our company’s biggest event of the year and Tweet and Facebook about it the whole time. The result? Hundreds of new followers and serious engagement from our people. That is amazing!

It seems like I’m going off track here, but I’m not really: I work for a publishing company, and because The Sidebar Review critiques magazines, I’m going to explain why it’s important for magazines to jump into the fray. (Most already have, but I still want to share my observations.)

  1. Our community was dying to connect and didn’t really know how. We gave them the “how.”: We had about 20,000 followers on our Facebook page before our big event. They occasionally chimed in when we asked them a question or posted a photo if they felt inspired. But in the last month, we have gained 3,000 followers, and they are posting everything — photos of their fish, their boats, bass pros; comments negative and positive; mistakes they saw on our website; questions about customer service matters; videos of them singing songs they wrote; and praise for their favorite pros. We had no idea how starved our audience was for more interaction with us, with the brand and with fellow fishermen. It was beautiful.
  2. Our brand has a “face” now.: Our brand is strong, but we’ve known for a while that people felt disconnected from us — like if they called or e-mailed us, they may or may not hear back, and if they did hear back, they may or may not hear from a human. Now, our readers have a direct line to us. One asked on our Facebook page if we would allow siamese twins to fish our tournaments as a single person then combine their catch; I replied, “One tournament entry per brain.” This guy thought it was hilarious. (I thought it was mildly amusing, but he really cracked up.) I think that guy will always remember our brand for that. And that’s important because people connect with people, not businesses; we’re finally a “people” again.
  3. Our followers feel special.: One Twitter follower commented that he was getting information faster from me through Twitter than through our auto-update website during the weigh-in. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but he felt like it was. I was recapping for him in an almost-live stream what was happening on stage, and he said he felt like he was there because of me. Another guy told me he and his family were at dinner but they were all crowded around his iPhone watching my Tweets. He felt like I was catering to him and his family when they couldn’t be near a computer. How cool is that?

We are so much more than a magazine. We always have been. But now our readers know that too. And that makes me beam with pride!

Do you connect with any magazines through social media? What has your experience been like?

–Tyler Reed

Editor, The Sidebar Review